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GeoJournal

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 267–272 | Cite as

Irrigation with saline water

  • Ben-Asher Jiftah 
Editorial: Water and Agriculture

Abstract

The potential of the saline water for irrigation against the background of the world's food shortage is reviewed. It is shown that irrigation has improved food situation wherever it has been used. However, irrigation is always associated with salinity problems. Leaching techniques and drip irrigation suggest a partial solution for the problem. The objective of this paper is to review and examine additional solutions in order to increase the use of saline water for irrigation. A quantitative approach to further research on the use of saline water for irrigation is suggested. An analytical solution to the mass-balance equation of nutrients and salt in the soil, which includes a sink term for absorption by a plant, revealed some valuable derivatives, both for planning further research in irrigation with saline water and making decisions about fertilization and soil leaching throughout the growth period of a crop. Preliminary attempts to meaningfully increase the fertilization level of crops irrigated with saline water support the approach that was developed from one of the model's derivatives.

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ben-Asher Jiftah 
    • 1
  1. 1.The Jacob Blaustein Institute for Desert Research, Sede Boqer CampusBen-Gurion University of the NegevIsrael

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