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Some heavy metals accumulate more in the flesh of Thryonomis swinderianus (Lem), grasscutter, than in beef of Bos species, cow

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Golow, A.A. Some heavy metals accumulate more in the flesh of Thryonomis swinderianus (Lem), grasscutter, than in beef of Bos species, cow. Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 50, 823–827 (1993). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00209945

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Keywords

  • Heavy Metal
  • Waste Water
  • Water Management
  • Water Pollution
  • Thryonomis Swinderianus