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Microorganisms and the natural environment

Abstract

Microorganisms are potentially capable of carrying out chemical transformations of organic and inorganic materials on a large scale. Their activity involves many reactions which may participate in geobiological formations. The microorganisms are affected by the environment and the environment has an influence on the microbial population. The presence or absence of certain compounds is critical for microbiological growth. As no pure strain of organisms exists in nature in complete isolation, it is necessary to consider the effect of individual biological systems on each other. Microorganisms are known for their ability to adjust themself to changes in the environment. This adjustment can demonstrate in reversible non-heriditary adaptive processes or more permanent heriditary forms, mutation.

Zusammenfassung

Mikroorganismen sind in der Lage, organische und anorganische Verbindungen in großem Maßstab umzuformen. Ihre Teilnahme an geologischen Prozessen spielt möglicherweise eine große Rolle. Mikroorganismen werden durch ihre Umwelt beeinflußt und wirken ihrerseits wieder zurück auf diese. Die An- oder Abwesenheit bestimmter Verbindungen wirkt entscheidend auf das mikrobiologische Wachstum. Da einzelne Organismen in der Natur nicht isoliert existieren können, müssen die Wechselwirkungen biologischer Systeme betrachtet werden. Die Fähigkeit sich an Veränderungen der Umwelt anzupassen, ist eine bekannte Fähigkeit der Mikroorganismen. Diese Anpassungsfähigkeit kann in reversiblen oder in nichtreversiblen erblichen Veränderungen (Mutationen) zum Ausdruck kommen.

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Trudinger, P.A., Bubela, B. Microorganisms and the natural environment. Mineral. Deposita 2, 147–157 (1967). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00201911

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Keywords

  • Biological System
  • Natural Environment
  • Mineral Resource
  • Inorganic Material
  • Microbial Population