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Planta

, Volume 186, Issue 1, pp 13–16 | Cite as

Developmentally regulated antigen associated with calcium crystals in tobacco anthers

  • Melanie C. Trull
  • Brian L. Holaway
  • William E. Friedman
  • Russell L. Malmberg
Article

Abstract

We have found and characterized an antigen associated with crystal-containing cells in the stomium and connective tissue of the anthers of Nicotiana tabacum L. (tobacco). The antigen, defined by the monoclonal antibody NtF-8B1, localizes to subcellular regions surrounding the crystals. At the light-microscope level, the antigen is detectable just after the first appearance of crystals in the connective tissue of the anther, and at approximately the same time as the appearance of crystals in the stomium. The antigen is not detectable on a Western blot, and gave inconclusive results on a test of periodate sensitivity. It is not the crystals themselves, nor is the presence of the crystals required for antibody recognition. The antigen is sensitive to heat and protease treatment, indicating that it is a protein. The antigen is not tightly membrane-bound, in spite of its localization closely surrounding the crystals. Chemical tests indicate that the druse crystals in the stomium are calcium oxalate.

Key words

Anthers (Ca crystals) Calcium oxalate crystals Nicotiana (calcium crystals antigen) 

Abbreviations

ELISA

enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

FITC

fluorescein isothiocyanate

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melanie C. Trull
    • 1
  • Brian L. Holaway
    • 1
  • William E. Friedman
    • 1
  • Russell L. Malmberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Botany DepartmentUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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