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Biological Cybernetics

, Volume 70, Issue 2, pp 99–107 | Cite as

On the use of size functions for shape analysis

  • A. Verri
  • C. Uras
  • P. Frosini
  • M. Ferri
Article

Abstract

According to a recent mathematical theory a shape can be represented by size functions, which convey information on both the topological and metric properties of the viewed shape. In this paper the relevance of the theory of size functions to visual perception is investigated. An algorithm for the computation of the size functions is presented, and many theoretical properties of the theory are demonstrated on real images. It is shown that the representation of shape in terms of size functions (1) can be tailored to suit the invariance of the problem at hand and (2) is stable against small qualitative and quantitative changes of the viewed shape. A distance between size functions is used as a measure of similarity between the representations of two different shapes. The results obtained indicate that size functions are likely to be very useful for object recognition. In particular, they seem to be well suited for the recognition of natural and articulated objects.

Keywords

Mathematical Theory Object Recognition Visual Perception Quantitative Change Real Image 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Verri
    • 1
  • C. Uras
    • 1
  • P. Frosini
    • 2
  • M. Ferri
    • 2
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universitá di GenovaGenoaItaly
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Matematica dell'Universitá di BolognaBolognaItaly

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