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Sediment analysis does not provide a good measure of heavy metal bioavailability to Cerastoderma glaucum (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in confined coastal ecosystems

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Correspondence to A. Gómez-Parra.

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Arjonilla, M., Forja, J.M. & Gómez-Parra, A. Sediment analysis does not provide a good measure of heavy metal bioavailability to Cerastoderma glaucum (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in confined coastal ecosystems. Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 52, 810–817 (1994). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00200688

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Keywords

  • Heavy Metal
  • Waste Water
  • Water Management
  • Water Pollution
  • Bivalvia