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Significance of regurgitation in avian toxicity tests

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Correspondence to A. D. M. Hart.

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Hart, A.D.M., Thompson, H.M. Significance of regurgitation in avian toxicity tests. Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 54, 789–796 (1995). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00197960

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Keywords

  • Toxicity
  • Waste Water
  • Water Management
  • Water Pollution
  • Toxicity Test