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Trees

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 224–234 | Cite as

Bud structure and resprouting in coppiced stools of Salix viminalis L., S. eriocephala Michx., and S. amygdaloides Anders

  • L. Sennerby-Forsse
  • L. Zsuffa
Article

Abstract

Fast-growing willows are cultivated as coppice in short rotation biomass plantations. The production and sustainability of the system is based on the ability of trees to resprout after repeated harvesting. The large variation in coppicing ability is due to plant genotypic differences in structure and physiology as well as environmental factors. Morphological and structural prerequisites for resprouting were compared in two shrubby willows with high coppicing ability, S. viminalis and S. eriocephala, and one tree-formed species, S. amygdaloides, with low coppicing ability. The initiation and development of buds and the resprouting pattern of coppiced stools were compared. All buds were axillary in origin and showed the same principal structure consisting of one main shoot primordium and two lateral primordia. In S. viminalis and S. eriocephala the lateral buds contained several leaf primordia and sprouted shortly after the main bud. In S. amygdaloides further development of lateral buds was inhibited after formation of two budscales, and leaf primordia were not formed until the buds were forced to sprout. The number of sprouts developing after coppicing were correlated to the structure and number of buds and their position on the stools. Self-thinning rate was high and many shoots originating from lateral buds died. Most buds were located above ground on the remaining basal portions of harvested stems. No adventitious buds were found on the stools. Significantly different bud differentiation pattern and frequent sylleptic sprouting resulted in lower coppice response in S. amygdaloides compared to S. viminalis and S. eriocephala.

Key words

Biomass plantations Buds Coppice Resprouting Willows 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Sennerby-Forsse
    • 1
  • L. Zsuffa
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Ecology and Environmental ResearchFaculty of ForestryUppsalaSweden
  2. 2.Swedish University of Agricultural SciencesUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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