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, Volume 3, Issue 2, pp 73–77 | Cite as

Protein synthesis in Pinus resinosa and the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus prior to ectomycorrhiza formation

  • Luc C. Duchesne
Original Articles
  • 28 Downloads

Summary

Seedlings of Pinus resinosa Ait. in test tubes were inoculated with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus Fr. or with discs of sterile modified Melin-Norkrans (MMN) medium. Paxillus involutus was also inoculated to control tubes in the absence of Pinus resinosa seedlings. In vivo labelling of proteins in Pinus resinosa roots and in Paxillus involutus mycelium was carried out using 35S l-methionine 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 days after inoculation. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDSPAGE) of the protein extracts from the four treatments and autoradiography demonstrated that the presence of root exudates altered protein synthesis in Paxillus involutus as three major bands disappeared when Paxillus involutus was exposed to root exudates. Protein synthesis in Pinus resinosa was also altered when Paxillus involutus was introduced into the tubes, since at least two bands were more intense when seedlings were inoculated with Paxillus involutus, as compared to control roots. No difference was observed in the growth and the label incorporation of Paxillus involutus growing with or without root exudates. Ectomycorrhizal roots were not formed during this experiment. Gene regulation in this ectomycorrhizal association occurs, therefore, prior to the formation of ectomycorrhizal roots.

Key words

Mycorrhizae Paxillus Pinus Root exudate Roots 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luc C. Duchesne
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Botany, Erindale CampusUniversity of Toronto in MississaugaMississaugaCanada

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