Springer Nature is making SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 research free. View research | View latest news | Sign up for updates

The European conflicts guide

  • 58 Accesses

Abstract

This article describes a project which involved an attempt to integrate an expert system with a hypertext database of primary and secondary text materials. Our chosen legal domain was that of the Convention on Jurisdiction and the Enforcement of Judgments in Civil and Commercial Matters (The Brussels Convention 1968). In this article, we address three dimensions of system design. With regard to the legal dimension, we consider the choice of domain and the representation of both knowledge and data in the system. On the technological dimension, we discuss the selection of software development tools and problems associated with keeping knowledge bases and databases up-to-date. Finally, we pay particular attention to the ‘Cinderella’ dimension of legal expert system development — the user interface.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Ashley, K. 1990. Modelling Legal Argument: Reasoning with Cases and Hypotheticals. MIT Press.

  2. Bing J. 1986. The Text Retrieval System as a Conversion Partner. The Yearbook of Law Computers and Technology, Volume 6, 25.

  3. Bochereau, L. Bourcier, D. & Bourgine, P. 1991. Extracting Legal Knowledge by means of a Multilayer Neural Network Application to Municipal Jurisprudence. In The Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law 288.

  4. Bratley, P. Fremont, J. Mackaay, E. & Poulin, D. 1991. Coping with Change. In The Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law 69.

  5. Bench-Capon, T. & Coenen, F. 1991. Exploiting Isomorphism: Development of a KBS to Support British Coal Insurance Claims. In The Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law 62.

  6. Capper, P. & Susskind, R. E. 1988. Latent Damage Law — The Expert System. Butterworth.

  7. Edwards, J. S. 1990. Mehodologies for Building Expert Systems/Knowledge-based Systems. BILETA Workshop.

  8. Edwards, L. & Huntley, J. A. K. 1992. Creating a Civil Jurisdiction Adviser. 1 Law Computers & Artificial Intelligence 5.

  9. Greenleaf, G. Mowbray, G. & Tyree, A. 1991. The DataLex Legal Workstation — Integrating Tools for Lawyers. In The Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law 215.

  10. Jackson, B. S. (chairman). 1991. Report of BILETA Inquiry into the Provision of Information Technology in UK Law Schools, para. 4. 1. 1.

  11. Kaye, P. 1987. Civil Jurisdiction and Enforcement of Foreign Judgments. Butterworth.

  12. Mennie, A. 1988. Civil Jurisdiction Flowchart. The New Law Journal, and Enforcement of Judgments Flowchart. The New Law Journal. Painter. D. Hyperlaw. 1990. The Proceedings of the Fifth BILETA Annual Conference 113.

  13. Reed, C. (ed.). 1990. Computer Law, 236. Blackstone Press.

  14. Susskind, R. E. 1987. Expert Systems in Law. Butterworth.

  15. van Opdorp, G. J. Walker, R. F. Schrichx, J. A. Groendijk, C. & van den Berg, P. H. 1991. Networks at Work: A Connectionist Approach to Non-deductive Legal Reasoning. In The Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law 278.

  16. White, R. C. A. & Currie, H. 1982. The Civil Jurisdiction and Judgments Act 1982. In Current Law Statutes Annotated. Widdison, R. C. 1991. Computing for Tomorrow's Lawyers. The New Law Journal 831.

  17. Widdison, R. C. 1992. Electronic Looseleaf Encyclopedias. Computers and Law 35. Widdison, R. C. & Pritchard, F. W. 1991. The EC Competition Adviser. Computers and Law 6.

  18. Wilson, E. 1989. A Guide to Justus: An Overview of a Hypertext Legal Database. In The Proceedings of the Fifth BILETA Annual Conference 163.

Download references

Author information

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Widdison, R., Pritchard, F. & Robinson, W. The European conflicts guide. Artif Intell Law 1, 291–304 (1992). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00186725

Download citation

Keywords

  • Expert System
  • Legal Procedure
  • Commercial Matter
  • Legal Domain
  • Brussels Convention