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Fertility control early in marriage in Ireland a century ago

Abstract

Data were extracted from the 1911 Irish manuscript census to study the regional variation in the extent and character of family limitation strategies in Ireland a century ago. Regression analysis of the data shows evidence of ‘spacing’ in both urban and rural Ireland. Further analysis of the so-called child ‘replacement’ problem also produces results consistent with ‘spacing’.

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Additional information

The comments of John Ermisch, Tim Guinnane, Randall Olson, Kevin O'Rourke, and two referees on an earlier version are gratefully appreciated. The research was financed by a grant from the Faculty of Arts Research Fund at University College, Dublin.

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Gráda, C.Ó., Duffy, N. Fertility control early in marriage in Ireland a century ago. J Popul Econ 8, 423–431 (1995). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00180877

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00180877

Keywords

  • Regression Analysis
  • Regional Variation
  • Limitation Strategy
  • Fertility Control
  • Family Limitation