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Emigration and living standards in Ireland since the Famine

Abstract

Ireland experienced dramatic levels of emigration in the century following the Famine of 1845–1849. The paper surveys the recent cliometric literature on post-Famine emigration and its effects on Irish living standards. The conclusions are that the Famine played a significant role in unleashing the subsequent emigration; and that emigration was crucial for the impressive increase in Irish living standards which took place during the next 100 years.

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Revised version of a paper read at the ESF Research Conference on Migration and Development, Aghia Pelaghia, Crete, Greece, October 7–12, 1994. I am grateful to Cormac Ó Gráda, Jeffrey Williamson and Klaus F. Zimmermann for comments and suggestions, and especially to three anonymous referees, as well as Tim Hatton and Alan Taylor who suggested the quantitative exercise to be found towards the end of Sect. 3.

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O'Rourke, K. Emigration and living standards in Ireland since the Famine. J Popul Econ 8, 407–421 (1995). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00180876

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00180876

Keywords

  • Significant Role
  • Living Standard
  • Impressive Increase
  • Irish Living