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Transportation

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 333–353 | Cite as

The role of subsidy policies in modernizing the structure of the bus transit industry

  • Richard L. Oram
Article

Abstract

Full reliance on conventional forms of bus transit for peak hour needs reduces industry productivity and creates major new subsidy requirements. Restructuring of transit is needed to enable paratransit integration and other innovations than can improve efficiency. This paper discusses the industry's long-term neglect of efficiency and describes subsidy policies that would promote necessary changes.

Keywords

Industry Productivity Conventional Form Subsidy Policy Full Reliance Transit Industry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard L. Oram
    • 1
  1. 1.Greater Bridgeport Transit DistrictBridgeportU.S.A.

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