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Public Choice

, Volume 39, Issue 2, pp 319–329 | Cite as

Bureaucratic productivity: The case of agricultural research revisited — A rejoinder

  • Vernon W. Ruttan
Article

Keywords

Agricultural Research Public Finance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vernon W. Ruttan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics and Department of EconomicsUniversity of MinnesotaSt. Paul

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