Beliefs, stereotypes and dynamic agent modeling

  • Afzal Ballim
  • Yorick Wilks
Article

Abstract

In many domains (such as dialogue participation and multi-agent cooperative planning) it is often necessary that the system maintains complex models of the beliefe of agents with whom it is interacting. In particular, it is normally the case that models of the beliefs of agents about another agent's beliefs must be modeled. While in limited domains it is possible to have such nested belief models pregenerated, in general it is more reasonable to have a mechanism for generating the nested models on demand. Two methods for such generation are discussed, one based on triggering stereotypes, and the other based on perturbation of the system's beliefs. Both of these approaches have limitations. An alternative is proposed that merges the two approaches, thus gaining the benefits of each and using those benefits to avoid the problems of either of the individual methods.

Key words

belief modeling nested beliefs stereotypes multi-agent cooperation 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Afzal Ballim
    • 1
  • Yorick Wilks
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut Dalle Molle pour les Etudes Semantiques et Cognitives (ISSCO)GenevaSwitzerland
  2. 2.Computing Research Laboratory, New Mexico State UniversityLas CrucesUSA

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