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Transportation

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 247–256 | Cite as

Evaluating employer programs encouraging the use of alternate transportation modes: Two studies

  • Lou McClelland
  • Mary B. Marks
  • Millie Eidson
  • Stuart W. Cook
Article

Abstract

Since 1976, major Denver metropolitan area firms have been required to encourage employees to use mass transit, carpooling, bicycling, and other “alternate transportation modes” to commute to work. The encouragement programs of 36 firms were clearly associated with greater use of alternate transportation modes, with the portion of variance in alternate transportation use explained by differences in employer programs of approximately 15%. The effects of the programs on deterring alternate mode users from returning to solo driving are consistently weaker than their effects on persuading drivers to try alternate transportation modes initially. Recommendations for the conduct of alternate transportation encouragement programs are made, based on these and other results. In addition, two recommendations are made concerning the evaluation of encouragement programs: that aggregate percentage change in alternate transportation use should not be used as the sole measure of success, and that environmental variables such as the availability of and pressure for use of alternate transportation modes should be measured and controlled.

Keywords

Transportation Environmental Variable Metropolitan Area Percentage Change Technology Management 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lou McClelland
    • 1
  • Mary B. Marks
    • 1
  • Millie Eidson
    • 1
  • Stuart W. Cook
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Behavioral ScienceUniversity of ColoradoBoulderU.S.A.

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