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Bureaucratic productivity: The case of agricultural research

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Professor in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics and in the Department of Economics, University of Minnesota. I am indebted to Armen A. Alchian, W. Keith Bryant, Maury E. Bredahl, Dana G. Dalrymple, Walter L. Fishel, Richard Gardner, Robert Haveman, Wallace Huffman, Yujiro Hayami, Glenn Nelson, Willis Peterson, Terry Roe, and Robert Sim for comments and suggestions on an earlier draft of this paper.

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Ruttan, V.W. Bureaucratic productivity: The case of agricultural research. Public Choice 35, 529–547 (1980). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00140084

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Keywords

  • Agricultural Research
  • Public Finance