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Higher Education

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 123–145 | Cite as

A review of the research of Ference Marton and the Goteborg Group: A phenomenological research perspective on learning

  • Graham Gibbs
  • Alistair Morgan
  • Elizabeth Taylor
Article

Abstract

This article reviews the work of Ference Marton and his group of researchers at the University of Goteborg in Sweden. It describes and explains research into: what students learn; how students approach studying; the relationship between approach to study and learning outcomes; what students understand learning to consist of; and whether it is possible to manipulate students' approach to studying in order to influence the learning outcomes. This review is intended to build up an overall picture of learning as seen from a phenomenological research perspective.

Keywords

Learning Outcome Research Perspective Phenomenological Research Goteborg Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Graham Gibbs
    • 1
  • Alistair Morgan
    • 2
  • Elizabeth Taylor
    • 2
  1. 1.Educational Methods UnitOxford PolytechnicOxfordUSA
  2. 2.Institute of Educational Technology, The Open UniversityUSA

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