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Abstract

In this paper, we present an approach to color image understanding that can be used to segment and analyze surfaces with color variations due to highlights and shading. The work is based on a theory—the Dichromatic Reflection Model—which describes the color of the reflected light as a mixture of light from surface reflection (highlights) and body reflection (object color). In the past, we have shown how the dichromatic theory can be used to separate a color image into two intrinsic reflection images: an image of just the highlights, and the original image with the highlights removed. At that time, the algorithm could only be applied to hand-segmented images. This paper shows how the same reflection model can be used to include color image segmentation into the image analysis. The result is a color image understanding system, capable of generating physical descriptions of the reflection processes occurring in the scene. Such descriptions include the intrinsic reflection images, an image segmentation, and symbolic information about the object and highlight colors. This line of research can lead to physicsbased image understanding methods that are both more reliable and more useful than traditional methods.

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Klinker, G.J., Shafer, S.A. & Kanade, T. A physical approach to color image understanding. Int J Comput Vision 4, 7–38 (1990). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00137441

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