Policy Sciences

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 61–82 | Cite as

Social impact assessment of regional plans: a review of methods and issues and a recommended process

  • James C. Cramer
  • Thomas Dietz
  • Robert A. Johnston

Abstract

Social impact assessment (SIA) is defined and related to other policy analysis techniques. Conceptual problems in conducting SIA are reviewed. Various SIA methods are identified and evaluated for their probable effectiveness in assessing regional plans. Regional planning conditions are identified and constraints to, and demands on, SIA are examined. A strategy for SIA is proposed which uses public inputs during cyclical planning iterations for efficiently identifying and assessing the most important social impacts.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • James C. Cramer
    • 1
  • Thomas Dietz
    • 1
  • Robert A. Johnston
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of CaliforniaDavis
  2. 2.Division of Environmental StudiesUniversity of CaliforniaDavis

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