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Automated knowledge acquisition for strategic knowledge

Abstract

Strategic knowledge is used by an agent to decide what action to perform next, where actions have consequences external to the agent. This article presents a computer-mediated method for acquiring strategic knowledge. The general knowledge acquisition problem and the special difficulties of acquiring strategic knowledge are analyzed in terms of representation mismatch: the difference between the form in which knowledge is available from the world and the form required for knowledge systems. ASK is an interactive knowledge acquisition tool that elicits strategic knowledge from people in the form of justifications for action choices and generates strategy rules that operationalize and generalize the expert's advice. The basic approach is demonstrated with a human-computer dialog in which ASK acquires strategic knowledge for medical diagnosis and treatment. The rationale for and consequences of specific design decisions in ASK are analyzed, and the scope of applicability and limitations of the approach are assessed. The paper concludes by discussing the contribution of knowledge representation to automated knowledge acquisition.

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Gruber, T.R. Automated knowledge acquisition for strategic knowledge. Mach Learn 4, 293–336 (1989). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00130716

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Key Words

  • knowledge acquisition
  • knowledge engineering
  • human-computer interaction
  • strategic knowledge
  • knowledge representation