On the benefits of interrelating computer science and the humanities: The case of metaphor

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Abstract

If there is to be a new, substantive area of teaching and research that combines competence in specific areas of the humanities with computer science understandings and skills, such teaching and research needs to be led by persons who themselves are competent in both the humanities and in computer science, rather than by a team of persons who represent a division of labors along the lines of “idea” persons and “technical” persons. The new kind of teaching and research that might result is pointed to by describing a connectionist, neural network approach to the study of metaphor.

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Christian Koch is associate professor of computer science at Oberlin College with teaching and research interests in the area of the interrelationship of computing and the liberal arts (from physics to philosophy).

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Koch, C. On the benefits of interrelating computer science and the humanities: The case of metaphor. Comput Hum 25, 289–295 (1991). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00120965

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Key Words

  • connectionism
  • neural networks
  • metaphor