Twenty years of research on advance organizers: Assimilation theory is still the best predictor of results

Abstract

Forty-four published research studies involving advance organizers were reviewed. Twenty-seven studies included an advance organizer vs. a control group (standard advance organizer study) and 17 studies included an advance organizer vs. a post organizer group (modified advance organizer study). Results of the studies were compared to the predictions of several theories. In addition, four specific predictions of assimilation theory were evaluated: that advance organizers should have a stronger effect for poorly organized text than for well organized text, that advance organizers should have a stronger positive effect for learners lacking prerequisite knowledge, that advance organizers should have a stronger effect for learners lacking prerequisite abilities, and that advance organizers should have an especially strong effect on measures of transfer rather than retention.

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Mayer, R.E. Twenty years of research on advance organizers: Assimilation theory is still the best predictor of results. Instr Sci 8, 133–167 (1979). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00117008

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Keywords

  • Research Study
  • Good Predictor
  • Organizer Group
  • Organizer Study
  • Specific Prediction