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Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry

, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 395–404 | Cite as

Column abundance and the long-term trend of hydrogen chloride (HCl) above the Jungfraujoch Station

  • R. Zander
  • G. Roland
  • L. Delbouille
  • A. Sauval
  • C. B. Farmer
  • R. H. Norton
Article

Abstract

The integrated column amount of hydrogen chloride has been monitored above the International Scientific Station of the Jungfraujoch (Switzerland) during the last 8 years. The results deduced from solar absorption measurements near 3.42 μm indicate a secular trend equivalent to (0.75±0.2) % increase per year since 1978, superimposed on a significant short-term variability which can be partly attributed to the tropospheric component of the total HCl burden. Based on an intensified set of measurements carried out over the last three years, a seasonal component in the total content of HCl has been established for the first time, showing a minimum occuring in early winter and a maximum during the spring.

Key words

Hydrogen chloride atmospheric composition trace gases trends 

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Zander
    • 1
  • G. Roland
    • 1
  • L. Delbouille
    • 1
  • A. Sauval
    • 2
  • C. B. Farmer
    • 3
  • R. H. Norton
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of AstrophysicsUniversity of LiègeLiège-OugréeBelgium
  2. 2.Observatiore Royal de BelgiqueBrussels-UccleBelgium
  3. 3.Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadenaU.S.A.

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