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Can ecosystems be healthy? Critical consideration of concepts

Abstract

Health, it is argued, implies that a system has an optimum state that can be defended. For organisms and populations this can be understood objectively and generally in terms of neo-Darwinian principles. Similar reasoning cannot be applied to ecosystems. The possible advantages and difficulties of applying this concept of health to ecosystems are critically considered.

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Calow, P. Can ecosystems be healthy? Critical consideration of concepts. J Aquat Ecosyst Stress Recov 1, 1–5 (1992). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00044403

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00044403

Keywords

  • analogy
  • control
  • fitness
  • optimization
  • teleology