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From aquatic science to ecosystem health: a philosophical perspective

Abstract

The development of an ecosystem (social, economic, environmental) approach to water management is traced from its origins in the Great Lakes of North America. The focus on health and integrity of ecosystems is an outgrowth of the Lamarckian concept of The Biosphere as a global system of matter, life, and mind. The driving forces behind the development of an ecosystem approach have been negative feedback from excessive demotechnic growth and faith that we can maintain a healthy relationship with Mother Earth.

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Vallentyne, J.R., Munawar, M. From aquatic science to ecosystem health: a philosophical perspective. Journal of Aquatic Ecosystem Health 2, 231–235 (1993). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00044026

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00044026

Keywords

  • health
  • ecosystem
  • Biosphere
  • Great Lakes
  • environmental management