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Somatic embryogenesis and callus production from cotyledon explants of Eastern black walnut

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Abstract

Starting at 8 weeks and continuing until 23 weeks (nut drop) after anthesis,1 m2 explants from cotyledons of immature seeds were extracted from Juglans nigra fruits. Explants were placed on Woody Plant Medium with 1 g l-1 casein hydrolysate and 30 g l-1 sucrose. The explants remained in light for 4 weeks on primary media containing a 3×3 factorial of 0.05, 0.5, or 5.0 μM thidiazuron (TDZ) and 0.1, 1.0, or 10.0 μM 2,4-d. Explants were transferred to a secondary medium containing no plant growth regulators and incubated in darkness for 11 weeks. The greatest number of somatic embryos was produced 8, 10, and 12 weeks after anthesis from explants on media with 0.5 or 5.0 μM TDZ and 0.1 or 1.0 μM 2,4-d. Explants produced the greatest callus volume and dry weight 10, 12, and 14 weeks after anthesis. Throughout the study, callus generally increased with increasing concentrations of both TDZ and 2,4-d.

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Abbreviations

BA:

6-benzyladenine

captan:

3a,4,7,7a-tetrahydro-2-[(trichloromethyl)thio]-1H-isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione

2,4-d :

2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

IBA:

indolebutyric acid

Physan:

n-alkyl- dimethyl-benzyl ammonium chlorides and n-alkyl-dimethyl-ethylbenzyl ammonium chlorides

TDZ-thidiazuron:

N-phenyl-N′-1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylurea

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Neuman, M.C., Preece, J.E., Van Sambeek, J.W. et al. Somatic embryogenesis and callus production from cotyledon explants of Eastern black walnut. Plant Cell Tiss Organ Cult 32, 9–18 (1993). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00040110

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