International Journal of Fracture

, Volume 67, Issue 4, pp 343–355 | Cite as

A hybrid technique of modeling of cracks using displacement discontinuity and direct boundary element method

  • Mohammed Ameen
  • B. K. Raghuprasad
Article

Abstract

A hybrid technique to model two dimensional fracture problems which makes use of displacement discontinuity and direct boundary element method is presented. Direct boundary element method is used to model the finite domain of the body, while displacement discontinuity elements are utilized to represent the cracks. Thus the advantages of the component methods are effectively combined. This method has been implemented in a computer program and numerical results which show the accuracy of the present method are presented. The cases of bodies containing edge cracks as well as multiple cracks are considered. A direct method and an iterative technique are described. The present hybrid method is most suitable for modeling problems involving crack propagation.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mohammed Ameen
    • 1
  • B. K. Raghuprasad
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringRegional Engineering CollegeCalicutIndia
  2. 2.Department of Civil EngineeringIndian Institute of ScienceBangaloreIndia

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