Gibberellins: perception, transduction and responses

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Hooley, R. Gibberellins: perception, transduction and responses. Plant Mol Biol 26, 1529–1555 (1994). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00016489

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Key words

  • gibberellin
  • growth
  • development
  • perception
  • receptor
  • gene expression
  • signal transduction
  • response mutant
  • calcium