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Hydrobiologia

, Volume 74, Issue 1, pp 7–10 | Cite as

Carotenoids in fish. XXVI. Pungitius pungitius (L.) and Gasterosteus aculeatus L. (Gasterosteidae)

  • B. Czeczuga
Article

Abstract

The author investigated the presence of various carotenoids in the different parts of the body of Pungitius pungitius (L.) and Gasterosteus aculeatus L. by means of columnar and thin-layer chromatography.

The investigations revealed the presence of the following carotenoids:
  • in Pungitius pungitius. α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, mutatochrome, zeaxanthin and astaxanthin;

  • in Gasterosteus aculeatus: β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, β-carotene epoxide, neothxanthin, canthaxanthin, mutatochrome, lutein, phoenicoxanthin, zeaxanthin, taraxanthin, tunaxanthin, astaxanthin, astaxanthin ester and α-doradexanthin. The total carotenoid content ranged from 2.229 to 138.504 µg/g wet weight.

Keywords

carotenoids Pungitius pungitius Gasterosteus aculeatus 

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Copyright information

© Dr. W. Junk b.v. Publishers 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Czeczuga
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of General BiologyMedical AcademyBiałystokPoland

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