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An Interactive Strategy of Grid and Electric Vehicles Based on Master-Slaves Game Model

  • Hongbo ChengEmail author
  • Tong Luo
  • Chen Kang
  • Jianbo Xin
  • Hua Wan
  • Feng Pei
  • Xu Tian
Original Article
  • 3 Downloads

Abstract

In order to avoid the adverse effects of the grid caused by disorder large-scale electric vehicles and improve supporting function of energy storage battery on the power grid, interaction model of electric vehicles (EVs) and the power grid is constructed according to a master-slave game method. Then, the utility functions of each participant are established, and the dynamic constraints of the batteries for EVs are established considering the travel demand of users. Then, based on the YALMIP/CPLEX solver, the optimal response strategy of the EVs can be obtained, and the genetic algorithm is used to solve the Nash equilibrium solution of the master-slaves game model. Moreover, the Monte Carlo method is employed to simulate the user travel data and the basic parameters of EVs in a certain area. Based on these data, the optimal time-of-use price in this area is offered, and the optimal response strategy of EVs under this price is analyzed. Finally, the study of the case show that the proposed game model can make the strategies of both the EVs and the grid, which can restrict the load fluctuation of the grid and improve the benefit of EVs without affecting their travel.

Keywords

Interaction EVs Power grid Time-of-use price Master-slaves game 

Notes

Funding

This article received funding from National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Number 51667008).

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Copyright information

© The Korean Institute of Electrical Engineers 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Electrical and Automation EngineeringEast China Jitaotong UniversityNanchangChina
  2. 2.State Grid Jiangxi Electric Power Co., Ltd.Electric Power Research InstituteNanchangChina

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