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“It is edible, so we eat it”: Insect supply and consumption in the central highlands of Madagascar

  • J . DürrEmail author
  • H. Andriamazaoro
  • S. Nischalke
  • N. Preteseille
  • A. Rabenjanahary
  • N. Randrianarison
  • C. Ratompoarison
  • A. Razafindrakotomamonjy
  • P. Straub
  • I. Wagler
Original Research Article
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Abstract

Entomophagy is a common practice in many parts of Madagascar, but the supply of insects for local consumption has hardly been explored. This study analyses insect harvesting, marketing and consumption in the central highlands of Madagascar. Based on focus group discussions, key informant interviews and interviews on markets, research shows that some insects are highly esteemed by consumers. The main species consumed are wild silkworm chrysalis, locusts, and beetles. The seasonal supply of edible insects does not satisfy the demand of the population. Insects are mostly harvested by villagers for own consumption. Only some species are marketed on the local level, and there are few traders involved. However, at least seasonally, insects seem to be an important food and income source for farmers and urban consumers. As wild harvesting is limited, and even decreased in recent years, shifting from wild gathering to rearing could compensate for this falling trend and offer a higher, more continuous supply of insects in a chronic food insecure region.

Keywords

Entomophagy Edible insects Wild silkworm Ambositra Sandrandahy 

Notes

Funding information

This article has been written within the ProciNut project at Center for Development Research, University of Bonn, Germany.

ProciNut is financially supported by the German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL), based on the decision of the Parliament of the Federal Republic of Germany, through the Federal Office for Agriculture and Food (BLE).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© African Association of Insect Scientists 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • J . Dürr
    • 1
    Email author
  • H. Andriamazaoro
    • 2
  • S. Nischalke
    • 1
  • N. Preteseille
    • 3
  • A. Rabenjanahary
    • 4
  • N. Randrianarison
    • 2
  • C. Ratompoarison
    • 4
  • A. Razafindrakotomamonjy
    • 4
  • P. Straub
    • 5
  • I. Wagler
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Development Research (ZEF)University of BonnBonnGermany
  2. 2.National Research Center for Development of Agriculture (FOFIFA)AntananarivoMadagascar
  3. 3.Mahidol UniversityPhutthamonthonThailand
  4. 4.University of AntananarivoAntananarivoMadagascar
  5. 5.University of WageningenWageningenNetherlands

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