Advertisement

Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration

, Volume 36, Issue 6, pp 1115–1126 | Cite as

Evaluation of Roof Bolter Canopy Air Curtain Effects on Airflow and Dust Dispersion in an Entry Using Blowing Curtain Ventilation

  • Y. ZhengEmail author
  • W.R. Reed
  • M.R. Shahan
  • J.P. Rider
Article
  • 78 Downloads

Abstract

Roof bolter operators may be exposed to high respirable dust concentrations on continuous miner sections with blowing face ventilation when bolting is performed downwind of the continuous miner. One solution to reduce the high respirable dust concentrations is to use a canopy air curtain (CAC) to deliver clean air from a filtered blower fan directly to the bolter operators under the canopies. The influence of CAC installation in the airflow and dust dispersion around the location of the roof bolter operator can be evaluated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This study, performed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), considers two scenarios: (1) a roof bolting machine in the center of the entry for installation of the fifth row of bolts from the face, and (2) a roof bolting machine positioned close to the face for the installation of the last row of bolts. In both scenarios, the bolting machine is placed in an environment which contains 6.0 mg/m3 of respirable dust and is ventilated by a blowing curtain with 3000 cfm (1.42 m3/s) of air. This environment is used to simulate the roof bolter machine operating downstream of a continuous mining machine. Two operation positions are simulated at the same bolting location: dual drill heads in the inward position for two inside bolts and dual drill heads in the outward position for two outside bolts. The influence of the CAC on airflows and dust dispersion is evaluated with the CAC operating at 250 cfm (0.12 m3/s).

Keywords

Canopy air curtain Dust control Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors of this paper sincerely acknowledge J. Drew Potts, Jay F. Colinet, Liming Yuan, and Lihong Zhou for their technical support.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Disclaimer

The findings and conclusions in this manuscript are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Mention of company or product does not constitute endorsement by NIOSH.

References

  1. 1.
    Blackley DJ, Halldin CN, Laney AS (2018) Continued increase in prevalence of coal workers’ pneumoconiosis in the United States, 1970-2017. Am J Public Health 108(9):1220–1222CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    The Office of the Federal Register (2018a) Code of federal regulations, 70.100 respirable dust standards. In: CFR Title 30, Chapter I, Subchapter O, Part 70, Subpart B, 70.100. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    The Office of the Federal Register (2018b) Code of federal regulations, 70.101 Respirable dust standard when quartz is present. In: CFR Title 30, Chapter I, Subchapter O, Part 70, Subpart B, 70.101. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Goodman GVR, Organiscak JA (2003) Assessment of respirable quartz dust exposures at roof bolters in underground coal mining. J Mine Vent Soc S Afr 56(2):50–54Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Colinet JF, Reed WR, Potts JD (2013) Impact on respirable dust levels when operating a flooded-bed scrubber in 20-foot cuts. NIOSH Report of Investigations 9683. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Office of Mine Safety and Health Research, PittsburghGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Potts JD, Reed WR, Colinet JF (2011) Evaluation of face dust concentrations at mines using deep-cutting practices. NIOSH Report of Investigations 9680. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Office of Mine Safety and Health Research, PittsburghGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kissell FN (2011) Silica dust at roof bolters. Min Eng 63(10):78–82Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Goodman GVR, Organiscak JA (2001) Laboratory evaluation of a canopy air curtain for controlling occupational exposures of roof bolters. In: Wasilewski S (ed) Research and development center for electrical engineering and automation in mining (EMAG). Proceedings of the 7th International Mine Ventilation Congress, June 17–22, 2001, Crakow, Poland, pp 299–305Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Goodman GVR, Organiscak JA (2002) Evaluation of methods for controlling silica dust exposures on roof bolters. In: Proceedings of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration Annual Conference, February 25–27, Phoenix, AZ, Preprint 02-163Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Krisko WJ (1975) Develop and test canopy air curtain devices. In: USBM Contract Report HO232067, U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines. PA/Donaldson Co. Inc, PittsburghGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Listak JM, Beck TW (2012) Development of a canopy air curtain to reduce roof bolters’ dust exposure. Min Eng 64(7):72–79Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Reed WR, Joy GJ, Kendall B, Bailey A, Zheng Y (2017) Development of a roof bolter canopy air curtain for respirable dust control. Min Eng 69(1):33–39CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Reed WR, Klima S, Shahan M, Ross G, Singh K, Cross R, Grounds T (2018a) A field study of a roof bolter canopy air curtain (2nd generation) for respirable coal mine dust control. In: Proceedings of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration Annual Conference, February 25–28, Minneapolis, MN, Preprint 18-003Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Zheng Y, Reed WR, Zhou L, Rider JP (2016) Computational fluid dynamics modeling of a medium-sized surface mine blasthole drill shroud. Min Eng 68(11):43–49CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    The Office of the Federal Register (2018c) Code of federal regulations, 75.325 Air quantity. In: CFR Title 30, Chapter I, Subchapter O, Part 75, Subpart D, 75.325. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Taylor CD, Chilton JE, Goodman GVR (2010) Guidelines for the control and monitoring of methane gas on continuous mining operations. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, DHHS (NIOSH) Publication, Pittsburgh 2010-141, Report of Investigations 9523, 2010 Apr; :1-75Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Petrov T, Wala AM, Huang G (2013) Parametric study of airflow separation phenomenon at face area during deep cut continuous mining. Min Technol 122(4):208–214CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Engel M, Johnson D, Raether T (1987) Improved canopy air curtain systems. US Bureau of Mines Contract Report JO318014, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Reed WR, Zheng Y, Yekich M, Ross G, Salem A (2018b) Laboratory testing of a shuttle car canopy air curtain for respirable coal mine dust control. Int J Coal Sci Technol 5(3):305–314CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© This is a U.S. government work and its text is not subject to copyright protection in the United States; however, its text may be subject to foreign copyright protection  2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)PittsburghUSA

Personalised recommendations