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Non-linear buckling analysis of composite columns made from high and normal strength concrete under fire

  • Abdelkadir FellouhEmail author
  • Abdelkader Bougara
  • Paulo A. G. Piloto
  • Nourredine Benlakehal
Original Paper
  • 2 Downloads

Abstract

Composite structures made from the combination of steel profile and concrete have significant loadbearing capacity which depends on the behaviour of the two material components and their interaction, particularly in fire conditions. It is not possible to assess the fire resistance of composite members only by considering the temperature of the steel, because the presence of the concrete may contribute greatly to increase the resistance, strength and thermal inertia of the member, which improves consequently the fire behaviour of the element. The aim of this work is to develop an efficient non-linear 3D finite element model to investigate the behaviour of pin-ended axially loaded composite column made from high strength concrete (HSC) and normal strength concrete (NSC) at different fire rating classes. Two types of column section were selected, notably HEB 160 profile totally encased with concrete and HEB220 partially encased with concrete. The fire behaviour of the columns was tested according to ISO834 standard fire. The results show that the use of HSC in composite columns reduces the level of fire protection with the regard to NSC. NSC in composite structures accommodates higher deflections than HSC, which is safer in case of fire accident. The mechanical resistance in composite columns at room temperature is reduced more than twice after 30 min of fire exposure.

Keywords

Composite column Fire Concrete Finite elements Non-linear Buckling 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

On behalf of all authors, the corresponding author (Abdelkadir Fellouh) states that there is no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Structures, Geotechnic and RisksHassiba Benbouali University of Chlef (UHBC)ChlefAlgeria
  2. 2.Department of Applied MechanicsPolytechnic Institute of Bragança (IPB)BragançaPortugal

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