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Performance of high-volume fly ash concrete after exposure to elevated temperature

  • M. S. Khan
  • M. ShariqEmail author
  • S. Akhtar
  • A. Masood
Research
  • 1 Downloads

Abstract

The purpose of the present research is to investigate the sustainable performance of fly ash concrete at elevated temperature. Initially, the optimum level of cement replacement with class F fly ash was determined. The concrete mixes, i.e., plain concrete (0% fly ash), 25% fly ash, and optimum level of cement replacement with fly ash (i.e., 40%), were chosen to determine the residual compressive strength of concrete after a single heating-cooling cycle of elevated temperature ranging from ambient to 400 °Cat an interval of 200 °C under unstressed and stressed conditions. The microstructure by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also examined for all the concrete mixes. During the heating-cooling process, the hysteresis loop at 400 °C is found larger than the hysteresis loop at 200 °C and ambient temperature. The 40% fly ash concrete showed a lower reduction in the residual compressive strength after heating at 400 °C under the unstressed condition. The 40% fly ash concrete has shown maximum residual compressive strength than 25% fly ash and plain concrete after heating at 200 °C and 400 °C under the unstressed and stressed conditions. The SEM analysis indicates a massive change in the morphology at 400 °C for plain and fly ash concrete mixes.

Keywords

Fly ash concrete Elevated temperature Unstressed condition Stressed condition Residual compressive strength Scanning electron microscopy 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Australian Ceramic Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Civil Engineering, Zakir Husain College of Engineering & TechnologyAligarh Muslim UniversityAligarhIndia
  2. 2.Department of Civil Engineering, College of EngineeringShaqra UniversityShaqraKingdom of Saudi Arabia

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