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Compositional and Mineralogical Analysis of Marine Sediments from Calabrian Selected Areas, Southern Italy

  • Francesco CaridiEmail author
  • Saveria Santangelo
  • Giuliana Faggio
  • Andrea Gnisci
  • Giacomo Messina
  • Giovanna Belmusto
Research paper
  • 9 Downloads

Abstract

This study is focused on the compositional and structural analysis of marine sediments from eight different sites of the Calabria region, south of Italy. For this purpose, a combination of spectroscopic techniques is utilised. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry is used for the quantitative elemental analysis of the investigated samples. To identify their crystalline mineral components and study their microstructure, X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering measurements are carried out. SiO2 and Al2O3 are the most abundant sediment components. Fe2O3, K2O, Na2O, MgO and CaO are also present in smaller amounts as well as TiO2 and P2O5. Sediments are characterised by a narrow range of Al2O3/SiO2 abundance ratio and a wider range of the overall Fe2O3 + MgO concentration. The analysis of the geochemical discriminating factors indicates that the marine sediments under study come from the dismantling and transportation of materials of the “Calabrian–Peloritan arc”, whose rocks are acidic intrusive igneous and metamorphic. From the environmental point of view, the obtained results can be used to assess changes in the pollution level due to geological processes.

Article Highlights

  • Compositional and mineralogical analysis of marine sediments from the Calabria region, south of Italy, were performed through X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  • SiO2 and Al2O3 are the most abundant sediment components. Fe2O3, K2O, Na2O, MgO, CaO are also present in smaller amounts, as well as TiO2 and P2O5.

  • Sediments are characterised by a narrow range of Al2O3/SiO2 abundance ratio (0.17–0.21%) and a wider range of the overall Fe2O3+MgO concentration (2.9–5.5%).

  • The analysis indicates that marine sediments under study come from the dismantling and transportation of materials of the “Calabrian-Peloritan arc”.

Keywords

Marine sediment X-ray fluorescence spectrometry X-ray diffraction Raman scattering 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no financial conflict of interest in the subject matter or materials discussed in this manuscript.

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Copyright information

© University of Tehran 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Reggio CalabriaEnvironmental Protection Agency of Calabria, Italy (ARPACal)Reggio CalabriaItaly
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, dell’Energia, dell’Ambiente e dei Materiali (DICEAM)Università “Mediterranea”Reggio CalabriaItaly
  3. 3.Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile (DIIES)Università “Mediterranea”Reggio CalabriaItaly

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