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Corpus Pragmatics

, Volume 2, Issue 3, pp 289–311 | Cite as

What’s Left to Say About Irish English Progressives? “I’m Not Going Having Any Conversation with You”

  • Aoife Ní MhurchúEmail author
Original Paper
  • 227 Downloads

Abstract

This paper examines progressive forms in an Irish English context. Through corpus based analysis, it identifies a number of non-standard progressive structures which are then isolated for more qualitative discourse analysis, drawing upon past studies of aspect in Irish English, and applying a pragmatic framework, where appropriate, to discuss issues surrounding these structures. The primary data are accessed from the Limerick Corpus of Irish English, a 1-million-word corpus of spoken Irish English, and then cross-referenced using three other corpora including from British and American English, in order to allow for cross-varietal comparisons. The study finds that the progressive acts as a softener in imperative structures or structures with a similar illocutionary force and as an intensifier in the habitual do be V-ing. Of particular note is be going + V-ing, a much-neglected structure in studies of Irish English to date, but which this study found to have a unique syntax and pragmatic function.

Keywords

Irish English Progressive aspect Corpus linguistics Pragmatics 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

On behalf of all authors, the corresponding author states that there is no conflict of interest.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University College CorkCorkIreland
  2. 2.University of LimerickLimerickIreland

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