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Historical Archaeology

, Volume 53, Issue 1, pp 86–102 | Cite as

Transfer-Printed Gastroliths: Fowl-Ingested Artifacts and Identity at Fort Vancouver’s Village

  • Emily C. TaberEmail author
  • Douglas C. Wilson
  • Robert Cromwell
  • Katie A. Wynia
  • Alice Knowles
Original Article
  • 14 Downloads

Abstract

Transfer-printed ceramics and other objects ingested by fowl provide unique data on the household production associated with a fur-trade center in the Pacific Northwest. Gastroliths are an indicator of the use of avifauna at archaeological sites, specifically those of the order Galliformes. The presence of ceramic and glass gastroliths at house sites within Fort Vancouver’s village provides evidence for the keeping and consumption of domestic fowl, including chickens and turkeys. The presence and concentration of these artifacts, combined with documentary and other evidence, provide clues about household economies in a culturally diverse colonial setting. While ethnic backgrounds of the villagers included native Hawai‘ian, American Indian, French Canadian, English, and American, archaeological and archival evidence points to shared practices emerging within Fort Vancouver Village.

Keywords

gastrolith avifauna identity fort historical foodways household economy 

Extracto

La cerámica impresa por transferencia y otros objetos ingeridos por aves proporcionan datos únicos sobre la producción doméstica asociada con un centro de comercio de pieles en el noroeste del Pacífico. Los gastrolitos son un indicador de la utilización de la avifauna en los sitios arqueológicos, específicamente los del orden de Galliformes. La presencia de gastrolitos de cerámica y vidrio en sitios domésticos dentro de la aldea de Fort Vancouver ofrece evidencias acerca del mantenimiento y consumo de aves domésticas, incluidos los pollos y pavos. La presencia y concentración de estos artefactos, en combinación con evidencias documentales y de otro tipo, proporcionan pistas sobre las economías domésticas en un ambiente colonial culturalmente diverso. Aunque los orígenes étnicos de los pobladores incluían hawaianos nativos, indios americanos, canadienses franceses, ingleses y americanos, las evidencias arqueológicas y de archivo apuntan a prácticas compartidas que emergían dentro de la aldea de Fort Vancouver.

Résumé

Les objets en céramique imprimée par transfert et autres objets ingérés par la volaille procurent des données uniques sur la production domestique associée au centre de traite des fourrures du nord-ouest du Pacifique. Les gastrolites sont des indicateurs de l’utilisation d’avifaunes dans les sites archéologiques, surtout celles de l’ordre des galliformes. La présence de gastrolites de céramique et de verre dans les maisons du village de Fort Vancouver est la preuve de l’élevage et de la consommation de volaille domestique, dont des poulets et des dindes. La présence et la concentration de ces artefacts, combinées à des preuves documentaires et autres, donnent des indices sur les économies des foyers d’un environnement colonial diversifié d’un point de vue culturel. Même si les antécédents ethniques des villageois étaient notamment hawaïens, amérindiens, canadiens-français, anglais et américains, les preuves archéologiques et archivistiques pointent vers la présence de pratiques communes émergeant du village de Fort Vancouver.

Notes

Acknowledgments:

Thanks are due to Dr. Virginia L. Butler, Dr. Beth Horton, Dr. Kristine M. Bovy, Dr. Michael Etnier, John Edwards, the National Park Service and Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Washington State University Vancouver, Portland State University, the Oregon Archaeological Society, Matthew Munsinger, the Fort Vancouver Archaeology Lab Volunteers in Parks, student interns, and the Fort Vancouver Public Archaeology Field School students. The second author (Wilson) was inspired over many years by discussions about archaeological gastroliths with Greg Burtchard, Daniel Martin, and Dennis Werth.

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Copyright information

© Society for Historical Archaeology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emily C. Taber
    • 1
    Email author
  • Douglas C. Wilson
    • 2
  • Robert Cromwell
    • 3
  • Katie A. Wynia
    • 2
  • Alice Knowles
    • 4
  1. 1.Applied Archaeological Research, Inc.PortlandU.S.A.
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologyPortland State UniversityPortlandU.S.A.
  3. 3.Fort Vancouver National Historic SiteVancouverU.S.A.
  4. 4.MilwaukieU.S.A.

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