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Commentary: Excavating the Intimate

  • Stacey Lynn Camp
Original Article

[T] he dangers represented by liminal people are managed by rituals that separate the marginal ones from their old status, segregating them for a time and then publicly declaring their entry into their new status. Colonial discourse repeatedly rehearses this pattern—dangerous marginality, segregation, reintegration. (McClintock 1995:25)

The above quote, taken from Anne McClintock’s (1995) Imperial Leather: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the Colonial Contest, documents the spatial, narrative, and visual techniques Europeans used to establish moral and social hegemony over individuals in their respective colonies. This process took many forms. It involved the birth and usage of racialized stereotypes regarding the colonized to prove their “dangerous marginality”; “segregation,” confinement, enslavement, and imprisonment; and the eradication of the lifeways of the oppressed through forced assimilation, whereby the oppressed adopt the value system of the oppressor yet are never fully...

Notes

Acknowledgments:

Thanks are owed to Jodi Barnes for inviting me to be a part of this needed issue. Thank you to the reviewer who provided helpful feedback on an earlier draft of this paper. Dr. Priscilla Wegars deserves much credit for encouraging me to pursue the archaeology of Japanese American incarceration and for assisting with the work every step of the way.

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Copyright information

© Society for Historical Archaeology 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingU.S.A.

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