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Historical Archaeology

, Volume 52, Issue 2, pp 227–233 | Cite as

J. C. Harrington Medal in Historical Archaeology: Julia A. King

  • Patricia M. Samford
  • Edward E. Chaney
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References

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  47. Strickland, Scott M., Julia A. King, G. Anne Richardson, Martha McCartney, and Virginia R. Busby 2016 Defining the Rappahannock Indigenous Cultural Landscape. Report to National Park Service Chesapeake Bay Office, Annapolis, MD, from St. Mary’s College of Maryland, St. Mary’s City.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Society for Historical Archaeology 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Jefferson Patterson Park and MuseumSt. LeonardU.S.A.

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