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Child Motivation and Family Environment Influence Outcomes of Working Memory Training in Extremely Preterm Children

  • Leona PascoeEmail author
  • Megan Spencer-Smith
  • Joshua Wiley
  • Katherine Lee
  • Gehan Roberts
  • Elisha Josev
  • Chiara Nosarti
  • Marc Seal
  • Nellie Georgiou-Karistianis
  • Lex W. Doyle
  • Deanne Thompson
  • Peter Anderson
Original Research
  • 51 Downloads

Abstract

Cognitive training can improve working memory in children at risk of working memory difficulties; however, response to training can vary and doubt exists if working memory improvements can be sustained long- term. This study aimed to explore whether child motivation and family environment are associated with working memory trajectories in children born extremely preterm or extremely low birth weight. Forty-five 7-year-old children completed Cogmed Working Memory Training® at home over 5–7 weeks. Children and their families completed working memory tests and child motivation and family environment questionnaires at baseline, with working memory further tested 2 weeks, 12 months and 24 months post-training. Latent growth modelling was used to explore whether child motivation and family environment factors were associated with working memory trajectories. Children’s desire for challenge, training competence, and being from a single-parent household were associated with short-term improvements in verbal short-term memory. Children from poorer functioning families were associated with short-term improvements in working memory. There was little evidence that child motivation or family environment was associated with long-term working memory changes. Child motivation and the training environment may be important for understanding training effects in children born extremely preterm or extremely low birth weight, and warrant closer examination in working memory training studies.

Keywords

Working memory, cognitive training Prematurity Motivation Family functioning Individual differences 

Abbreviations

STM

Short-term memory

WM

Working memory

EP

Extremely preterm

ELBW

Extremely low birth weight

LGM

Latent growth model

Notes

Funding Information

This research was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC: Project Grant 1028422, Centre of Research Excellence in Newborn Medicine (1060733), Program Grant 606789, Senior Research Fellowship 1081288, Career Development Fellowship 1085754), Monash University and the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute. The Murdoch Children’s Research Institute is supported by the Royal Children’s Hospital, The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation, Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne and the Victorian Government’s Operational Infrastructure Support Program.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

The study was approved by the Royal Children’s Hospital Human Research Ethics Committee in Melbourne, Australia. Written informed consent was obtained from primary caregivers before participation.

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Supplementary material

41465_2019_138_MOESM1_ESM.docx (91 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 91 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leona Pascoe
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Megan Spencer-Smith
    • 1
    • 2
  • Joshua Wiley
    • 1
  • Katherine Lee
    • 2
    • 3
  • Gehan Roberts
    • 2
    • 3
  • Elisha Josev
    • 2
    • 3
  • Chiara Nosarti
    • 4
  • Marc Seal
    • 2
    • 3
  • Nellie Georgiou-Karistianis
    • 1
  • Lex W. Doyle
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
    • 6
  • Deanne Thompson
    • 2
    • 3
    • 7
  • Peter Anderson
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Turner Institute for Brain and Mental HealthMonash UniversityClaytonAustralia
  2. 2.Murdoch Children’s Research InstituteParkvilleAustralia
  3. 3.Department of PaediatricsThe University of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia
  4. 4.King’s College LondonLondonEngland
  5. 5.Neonatal ServicesThe Royal Women’s HospitalMelbourneAustralia
  6. 6.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyThe University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  7. 7.Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental HealthParkvilleAustralia

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