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Presence of the Wondrous Jewel Squid Histioteuthis miranda (Cephalopoda: Histioteuthidae) in the Eastern Arabian Sea and Determination of its Age from Statoliths

  • K. K. Sajikumar
  • V. Venkatesan
  • C. P. Binesh
  • Gishnu Mohan
  • N. K. Sanil
  • V. Kripa
  • K. S. Mohamed
Article
  • 35 Downloads

Abstract

Experimental trawl survey cruises covering twelve stations around Lakshadweep archipelago, in southeastern Arabian Sea, caught eleven individuals of the uncommon squid, Histioteuthis miranda. This is the first record from waters around India. These specimens were caught in midwater trawl net operated from research vessel “FV Silver Pompano” at a depth of 200 m during night. Detailed morphometric and meristic measurements and molecular taxonomic studies confirmed the species identity. Assuming daily deposition of statolith rings, analysis of increments revealed that the species had slow growth reaching 24 mm dorsal mantle length (DML) at the age of 83 days with an average daily growth rate of 0.28 mm DML/day. A juvenile specimen with 13 mm DML had 68 increments with growth rate of 0.19 mm DML/day. Aberrant microstructure (additional nucleus and rings) were found in the statolith of a 24 mm DML specimen.

Keywords

Wondrous Jewel Squid Arabian Sea Aberrant statolith Mesopelagic squid 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are thankful to the Director of CMFRI for facilities. We are indebted to Jessy Kelly, Auckland University, New Zealand for help in the identification. Thanks are also extended to Alexander Arkhipkin, Chief Scientist, Fisheries Department, Falkland Islands and Isabella Rosso, Scripps Institute, USA for comments and suggestions and to KR Muraleedharan and Sebin John, of National Institute of Oceanography, Kochi for their help in CTD data analysis. We also gratefully acknowledge captain and crew of F.V. Silver Pompano for help during the cruise. We would like to thank anonymous reviewers for their constructive comments.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Central Marine Fisheries Research InstituteKochiIndia

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