Advertisement

Chinese Political Science Review

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 455–473 | Cite as

Political Legitimacy, from the National to the International

  • Jean-Marc CoicaudEmail author
Original Article
  • 51 Downloads

Abstract

The article explores the question of legitimacy at the national and international levels. It starts by showing that in the modern era it is mainly in the context of the national realm that political legitimacy has been recognized and treated as a key issue. The article explains why this has been the case. It continues by indicating that at the international level political legitimacy is equally important. It highlights this idea by unpacking some of the pivotal distinctions and themes that structure the question of political legitimacy internationally, such as: we/them; inside/outside; universalist/particularist; and system/society. It ends with giving historical illustrations of these structural distinctions at work.

Keywords

International legitimacy National level International level Structural distinctions of international legitimacy Westphalia 

References

  1. Anderson, Carol. 2003. Eyes off the price: the United Nations and the African–American struggle for human rights. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Blumenberg, Hans. 1985. The legitimacy of the modern age. Trans. Robert M. Wall. Cambridge: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  3. Brown, Chris, Nardin Terry, and Nicholas Rengger (eds.). 2003. International relations in political thought: texts from the Ancient Greeks to the First World War. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Brunée, Jutta, and Stephen J. Toope. 2010. Legitimacy and legality in international law: an international account. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Buchanan, Allen. 2004. Justice, legitimacy, and self-determination: moral foundations for international law. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Bukovansky, Mlada. 2002. Legitimacy and power politics: the American and French revolutions in international political culture. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Buzan, Barry. 2004. From international to world society? English school theory and the social structure of globalisation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Chapoutot, Johann. 2017. La révolution culturelle nazie. Paris: Gallimard.Google Scholar
  9. Clark, Ian. 2005. Legitimacy in international society. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Clark, Ian. 2007. International legitimacy and world society. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Coicaud, Jean-Marc. 2016. Emotions and passions of death in the making of world war II: the cases of Germany and Japan. In Emotions and passions in international politics: beyond mainstream international politics, ed. Yohan Ariffin, Jean-Marc Coicaud, and Vesselin Popovski. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Coicaud, Jean-Marc. 2019. The paradoxical perception of contemporary democracy, and the question of its future. Glob Policy 10 (1): 110–121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Falk, Richard, Mark Juergensmeyer, and Popovski Vesselin (eds.). 2012. Legality and legitimacy in global affairs. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Franck, Thomas M. 1990. The power of legitimacy among nations. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Furet, Francois Furet. 1999. The passing of an illusion: the idea of communism in the twentieth century. Trans. Deborah Furet. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  16. Gauchet, Marcel. 1997. The disenchantment of the world: a political history of religion. Trans. Oscar Burge. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Gluck, Carol. 1985. Japan’s modern myths: ideology in the late meiji period. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Goldsmith, Jack L., and Eric A. Possner. 2005. The limits of international law. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Gong, Gerrit W. 1984. The standard of “civilization” in international society. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  20. Habermas, Jürgen. 2018. Philosophical introductions: five approaches to communicative reason. Trans. Ciaran Cronin. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  21. Heilbron, Johan. 1995. The rise of social theory. Trans. Sheila Gogol. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  22. Linklater, Andrew, and Hidemi Suganami. 2006. The English school of international relations: a contemporary reassessment. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Liu, Lydia H. 2004. The clash of empires: the invention of China in modern world making. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  24. MacMillan, Margaret. 2001. Paris 1919: six months that changed the world. New York: Random House.Google Scholar
  25. Meyer, Lukas H. (ed.). 2009. Legitimacy, justice and public international law. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  26. Rawls, John. 2005. A theory of justice: original edition. Cambridge: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. (Reissue edition).Google Scholar
  27. Reus-Smit, Christian. 1999. The moral purpose of the state: culture, social identity, and institutional rationality in international relations. Princeton University Press: Princeton.Google Scholar
  28. Richir, Marc. 1974. Révolution et transparence sociale. In Considérations sur la Révolution Française, ed. J. G. Fichte. Trans. Marc Richir. Paris: Payot.Google Scholar
  29. Roth, Brad R. 2000. Governmental illegitimacy in international law. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Simmons, A. 2001. John, justification and legitimacy: essays on rights and obligations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  31. Suganami, Hidemi. 2008. The domestic analogy and world order proposals. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  32. Wang, Hui. 2014. China from empire to nation-state. Trans. Michael Gibbs Hill. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Fudan University 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Fudan Institute for Advanced Study in Social Sciences (Fudan-IAS), Fudan UniversityShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Rutgers School of LawRutgers University, State University of New JerseyNew JerseyUSA

Personalised recommendations