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Sleep and Biological Rhythms

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 155–157 | Cite as

REM sleep behavior disorder predisposed by neuroleptic malignant syndrome: a case report

  • Michiko Konno
  • Takahiro Suzuki
  • Tadashi Kanamori
  • Ryuji Furihata
  • Hiromi Yokose
  • Hideyuki Kubo
  • Mayumi Akiyama
  • Masahiro SuzukiEmail author
  • Makoto Uchiyama
Case Report
  • 29 Downloads

Abstract

A 44-year-old man was confirmed by polysomnography to have rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) following recovery from haloperidol- and risperidone-induced neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). RBD symptoms persisted for 30 days. Subsequently, no clinical symptoms or polysomnographic findings of RBD have been observed for 3 years. RBD is reported to be associated with Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, which involve brainstem dopaminergic hypofunction. However, no reports have documented RBD due to drug-induced dopaminergic hypofunction. This appears to be the first observation of RBD in relation to pharmacological dopaminergic dysfunction.

Keywords

REM sleep behavior disorder REM sleep without muscle atonia Neuroleptic malignant syndrome 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they had no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Sleep Research 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michiko Konno
    • 1
  • Takahiro Suzuki
    • 2
  • Tadashi Kanamori
    • 2
  • Ryuji Furihata
    • 2
  • Hiromi Yokose
    • 2
  • Hideyuki Kubo
    • 2
  • Mayumi Akiyama
    • 2
  • Masahiro Suzuki
    • 2
    Email author
  • Makoto Uchiyama
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for University-wide Education, Faculty of Health SciencesSaitama Prefectural UniversityKoshigayaJapan
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryNihon University School of MedicineItabashiJapan

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