Advertisement

Waste materials and by-products as mineral fillers in asphalt mixtures

  • Eman W. Tarbay
  • Abdelhalim M. AzamEmail author
  • Sherif M. El-Badawy
Technical Paper
  • 73 Downloads

Abstract

Mineral filler has a significant effect on the asphalt mixtures performance. This paper presents the use of waste materials (marble and granite) and by-product material (steel slag) as alternative to the mineral conventional filler. A control mix with the limestone filler was designed by Marshall method then, a replacement of limestone filler by the waste and by-products materials was done. Two types of mastic asphalt samples were prepared (virgin and aged by the rolling thin-film oven) with the ratio of 1:1 (mineral filler/asphalt). The samples were tested in penetration, softening point and Brookfield rotational viscosity. Furthermore, the transition electron microscope for fillers and scanning electron microscopy for mastics tests were performed. Both virgin and RTFO granite mastics improved the penetration value; however, the marble mastics showed the highest softening point temperature and RV viscosity. Marshall results showed that mixtures containing waste marble yielded the highest stability. Moreover, results showed the ability of marble to improve the moisture damage resistance in terms of tensile strength ratio and loss of stability. Finally, the field performance was predicted using Quality-Related Specifications Software which is a simplification of the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide software. It was found that all materials enhanced rutting resistance compared to the traditional limestone filler.

Keywords

Waste material TSR Asphalt mastic QRSS Rutting Fatigue cracking 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to Dr. Mohamed Elshabrawy, Professor Emeritus of Highway, Traffic, and Transportation, Faculty of Engineering, Mansoura University for his support and guidance.

References

  1. 1.
    Nemerow NL, Agardy FJ (2005) Environmental solutions environmental problems and the all-inclusive global, scientific, political, legal, economic, medical, and engineering bases to solve them, 1st edn. Academic Pres Inc, San Diego. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780120884414500009
  2. 2.
    El-Gammal MI, Ibrahim MS, Badr EA, Asker SA, El-Galad NM (2011) Health risk assessment of marble dust at marble workshops. Nat Sci 9(11):144–154. http://www.sciencepub.net/nature/ns0911/018_7160ns0911_144_153.pdf
  3. 3.
    Hamza RA, El- Haggar S, Khedr S (2011) Marble and granite waste: characterization and utilization in concrete bricks. Int J Biosci Biochem Bioinform 1(4):286–291.  https://doi.org/10.7763/ijbbb.2011.v1.54 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Chandra S, Choundhary R (2013) Performance characteristics of bituminous concrete with industrial wastes as filler. J Mater Civ Eng 25(11):1666–1673. https://journals.squ.edu.om/index.php/tjer/article/viewFile/128/140
  5. 5.
    Eisa MS, Basiouny ME, Youssef AM (2018) Effect of using various waste materials as mineral filler on the properties of asphalt mix. Innov Infrastruct Solut 3(1):3–27CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Othman AM (2009) Incorporation of white cement dust on rubber modified asphalt concrete mixtures. Int J Civ Environ Eng IJCEE 9(10):40–51. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/266266593_Incorporation_of_White_Cement_Dust_on_Rubber_Modified_Asphalt_Concrete_Mixtures
  7. 7.
    Fatima E, Sahu S, Jhamb A, Kumar R (2014) Use of ceramic waste as filler in semi-dense bituminous concrete. Am J Civ Eng Arch 2(3):102–106. http://pubs.sciepub.com/ajcea/2/3/2
  8. 8.
    Muniandy R, Aburkaba E, Taha R (2013) Effect of mineral filler type and particle size on the engineering properties of stone mastic asphalt pavements. J Eng Res 10(2):13–32. https://journals.squ.edu.om/index.php/tjer/article/view/128
  9. 9.
    Zulkati A, Diew W, Delai DS (2012) Effects of fillers on properties of asphalt-concrete mixture. J Transp Eng, ASCE 138(7):902–910.  https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)TE.1943-5436.0000395 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    AASHTO T53-09 (2013) Standard test method for softening point of bitumen (ring-and-ball apparatus). American Association of State and Highway Transportation Officials, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Egyptian Code for Urban and Rural Roads (2008) Part 4: road material and its tests, table 1-3-2. Housing and Building National Research CenterGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    AASHTO T89-13 (2017) Standard method of test for determining the liquid limit for soil. American Association of State and Highway Transportation Officials, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    AASHTO T90-16 (2016) Standard method of test for determining the plastic limit and plasticity index of soils. American Association of State and Highway Transportation Officials, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    AASHTO T11 (2005) Standard test method for materials finer than 75 mm (no. 200) sieve in mineral aggregate by washing. American Association of State and Highway Transportation Officials, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    AASHTO T84-13 (2017) Standard test method for relative density (specific gravity) and absorption of fine aggregate. American Association of State and Highway Transportation Officials, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Ezzat H, El-Badawy SM, Gbr A, Zaki S, Breakah T (2018) Predicted performance of hot mix asphalt modified with nano-montmorillonite and nanosilicon dioxide based on Egyptian conditions. Int J Pavement Eng.  https://doi.org/10.1080/10298436.2018.1502437 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    AASHTO T245-15 (2015) Standard test method for marshall stability and flow of asphalt mixtures. American Association of State and Highway Transportation Officials, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    AASHTO T 165-02 (2006) Standard method of test for effect of water on compressive strength of compacted bituminous mixtures. American Association of State and Highway Transportation Officials, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    AASHTO T283-14 (2014) Standard test method for effect of moisture on asphalt concrete paving mixtures. American Association of State and Highway Transportation Officials, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    AASHTO T240-13 (2017) Standard test method for effect of heat and air on a moving film of asphalt (rolling thin-film oven test). American Association of State and Highway Transportation Officials, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Aburkaba E, Muniandy R (2016) An overview of the use of mineral fillers in asphalt pavements. Aust J Basic Appl Sci 10(9):279–292Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Grabowski W, Wilanowicz J (2008) The structure of mineral fillers and their stiffening properties in filler–bitumen mastics. Mater Struct 41:793–804CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Wasilewska M, Małaszkiewicz D, Ignatiuk N (2017) Evaluation of different mineral filler aggregates for asphalt mixtures. IOP Conf Ser Mater Sci Eng.  https://doi.org/10.1088/1757-899x/245/2/022042 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Antunes V, Freire AC, Quaresma L, Micaelo R (2016) Effect of the chemical composition of fillers in the filler–bitumen interaction. Constr Build Mater 104:85–91CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Elshaeb MA, El-Badawy SM, Shawaly El-SA (2014) Development and impact of the egyptian climatic conditions on flexible pavement performance. Am J Civ Eng Arch 2(3):115–121. http://pubs.sciepub.com/ajcea/2/3/4/
  26. 26.
    El-Badawy S, Jeong M, El-Basyouny M (2009) Methodology to predict alligator fatigue cracking distress based on AC dynamic modulus. Transp Res Rec J Transp Res Board 2095-12:115–124. http://trrjournalonline.trb.org/doi/10.3141/2095-12
  27. 27.
    Moulthrop J, Witczak M (2011) NCHRP report 704: A performance related specification for hot mixed asphalt. Transportation Research Board, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    El-Badawy S, Witczak M, El-Basyouny M (2006) Incorporation of the New (2005) E* predictive model in the MEPDG, NCHRP 1-40D final report. Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, Dec 2006Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nile Institute for Engineering and TechnologyMansouraEgypt
  2. 2.Highway and Airport Engineering Laboratory, Public Works Engineering DepartmentMansoura UniversityMansouraEgypt
  3. 3.Civil Engineering Department, College of EngineeringJouf UniversityAl JawfKingdom of Saudi Arabia

Personalised recommendations