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Derived Relational Responding and Intelligence: Assessing the Relationship Between the PEAK-E Pre-assessment and IQ with Individuals with Autism and Related Disabilities

  • Mark R. Dixon
  • Jordan Belisle
  • Caleb R. Stanley
Original Article

Abstract

The present study evaluated the relationship between derived relational responding demonstrated by 64 individuals with developmental or intellectual disabilities (90.63% of which had an autism diagnosis) and their corresponding performance on standardized IQ assessments. Participants’ relational abilities were assessed using the Promoting the Emergence of Advanced Knowledge Equivalence Pre-Assessment (PEAK-E-PA), and IQ was assessed using either the WISC-IV Short Form assessment or the WPPSI-III Short Form assessment. The data indicated a strong, significant correlation between participant scores on the PEAK-E-PA and IQ both in terms of raw IQ (r = .843, p < .01), as well as full scale IQ (r = .804, p < .01), which is further analyzed in terms of each of the four subtests of the PEAK-E-PA (reflexivity, symmetry, transitivity, and equivalence). The obtained results have implications for a behavior analytic understanding of factors that relate to the development of intelligent behavior in individuals with disabilities.

Keywords

Autism Intelligence Relational frame theory Stimulus equivalence 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to acknowledge the contributions of Allison Ribley, Maureen O’Connor, and Jomi Hirata for their contributions and time dedicated to collecting the data presented in the current study.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Mark R. Dixon receives small royalties from the sales of the PEAK curriculum. All remaining authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the Institutional and/or National Research Committee and with the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants, guardians, and/or agencies who were included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark R. Dixon
    • 1
  • Jordan Belisle
    • 1
  • Caleb R. Stanley
    • 1
  1. 1.Rehabilitation InstituteSouthern Illinois UniversityCarbondaleUSA

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