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A High Efficiency and Low Carbon Oriented Machining Process Route Optimization Model and Its Application

  • Zhaohui Deng
  • Lishu LvEmail author
  • Wenliang Huang
  • Yangdong Shi
Regular Paper
  • 33 Downloads

Abstract

This paper aims to reduce the carbon emission of the manufacturing process and to achieve the low carbon optimization decision of the machining process route. Carbon emission was analyzed from the perspective of material flow, energy flow and environmental flow, and the machining process route carbon efficiency model was established based on the one from per unit cutted-volume. A multi-objective machining process route optimization model was established based on the genetic algorithms (GA), and the minimum processing time (high efficiency) and the optimal carbon efficiency (low carbon) were set as the optimization objectives. An experiment case study was performed on grinding carriage box, and a comparison was given between the optimized process and traditional process. The results indicate the resultant process route from the proposed algorithm, which verifies to reduce the processing time and increase the carbon efficiency.

Keywords

Machining process route Three flows model Carbon efficiency High efficiency and low carbon Genetic algorithms 

Abbreviations

Qprocess

Carbon efficiency of machining process

Cprocess

Carbon emissions generated in machining process

ΔV

Material removal volume in machining process

M

Material flow consumption

E

Energy flow consumption

W

Environmental flow consumption

i(i = 1, 2…i0)

Each process

j(j = 1, 2…j0)

All kinds of materials

k(k = 1, 2…k0)

All kinds of energy

l(l = 1, 2, …l0)

All kinds of pollutants

CM,CE,CW

The carbon emission from material flow/energy flow/environmental flow

fMN,fEN,fWN

Carbon emission factor of the corresponding material flow/energy flow/environmental flow

N

The natural number

CMrmc,CMclc,CMctc,CMfc

The carbon emission from raw materials consumption/coolant liquid consumption/cutting tools consumption/fixtures consumption

Δm

The removed quality of the material

fMrmc,fMclc,fMctc,fMfc

The carbon emission factor of removed material consumption/coolant fluid consumption/cutting tool consumption/fixture consumption

Tprocess

The processing time

Trct

The replacement cycle time of coolant fluid

ρcf

The coolant fluid density,

Vrvf

The replaced volume of coolant fluid

Ttl

The tool life

mct

The quality of cutting tool

Trcf

The replacement cycle time of fixture

mf

The quality of fixture

Pe

The machine input power

Pu

No-load power

Pc

Cutting power

Pa

Additional load loss power

Tno- load

The no-load time of machine tool

fEeec

The carbon emission factor of electric energy consumption

fWad,fWlwd

The carbon emission factor of attle disposal/liquid waste disposal

F

Machining features

P

Machining methods

Fa

The ath feature element

\(M_{{^{{_{b} }} }}^{'}\)

The bth machine

\(T_{c}^{'}\)

The cth tool

mea

The set of all the machining elements

Ttotal

The total processing time

Tppt

Part processing time

Tmrt

Machine replacement time

Ttrt

Tool replacement time

Temrt

Each machine replacement time

Tetrt

Tools replacement time

RCi(x), OCi(x)

The rationality constraints/optimal constraints

Ω

The set of all the solutions in the component processing elements

Si

Machining procedure code

ω1, ω2

The weight coefficients

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by National High Technology R&D Program (863 Program) of China [Grant No. 2014AA041504]; National Natural Science Foundation of China [Grant No. U1809221]; Green Manufacturing System Integration Project of China.

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Copyright information

© Korean Society for Precision Engineering 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhaohui Deng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lishu Lv
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Wenliang Huang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yangdong Shi
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Intelligent Manufacturing Institute of HNUSTHunan University of Science and TechnologyXiangtanChina
  2. 2.Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of High Efficiency and Precision Machining of Difficult-to-Cut MaterialHunan University of Science and TechnologyXiangtanChina

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