Journal of Endocrinological Investigation

, Volume 37, Issue 10, pp 1001–1008 | Cite as

Carotid intima media thickness and other cardiovascular risk factors in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

Original Article

Abstract

Purpose

Patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease due to many factors. The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and subclinical atherosclerosis as indicated by carotid intima media thickness in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

Methods

Thirty-two children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (3–17 years) were compared with 32 healthy controls. All underwent anthropometric evaluation, measurement of fasting lipids, glucose, insulin, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT).

Results

Fasting glucose, glucose at 30, 60, 90, and 120 min during OGTT were significantly higher in patients. HOMA-IR was also significantly higher in patients (p = 0.036). Patients had significantly higher CIMT (p = 0.003), and higher systolic blood pressure. (p = 0.04). No significant difference existed in lipid profile. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressures correlated with treatment duration (p = 0.002, p = 0.043, respectively).

Conclusion

Children with CAH are at increased risk of insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, early atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. Screening of these patients at an early age is recommended.

Keywords

Congenital adrenal hyperplasia Carotid intima media thickness Insulin resistance 

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Copyright information

© Italian Society of Endocrinology (SIE) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Paediatrics DepartmentAin Shams UniversityCairoEgypt
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyAin Shams UniversityCairoEgypt
  3. 3.CairoEgypt

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