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Behavior Analysis in Practice

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 782–794 | Cite as

A Descriptive Analysis of Applied Behavior Analysis Research With Economically Disadvantaged Children

  • Brandi Fontenot
  • Margaret Uwayo
  • Sarah M. Avendano
  • Denise RossEmail author
Special Section: Diversity and Inclusion
  • 73 Downloads

Abstract

In the United States, approximately 43% of children under age 18 are considered economically disadvantaged. Research suggests that these children are at a greater risk for academic underperformance and dropping out of school than their peers who are not from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. As such, they may need effective educational interventions to improve their academic performance. The purpose of the current article is to describe the degree to which economically disadvantaged children are included in educational research in behavioral journals. Ninety-four studies were analyzed to determine the publication trends between 1968 and 2017. Studies were scored and categorized based on journal; publication year; several demographic characteristics for participants including age, income status, and disability diagnosis; and research designs, interventions, and target behaviors. Results suggest that economically disadvantaged children are increasingly included in behavior-analytic literature. However, there are opportunities for research with English language learners and children with disabilities. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

Keywords

Economically disadvantaged Low socioeconomic status Children Education Schools 

Notes

Funding

This article was not funded.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Brandi Fontenot, Margaret Uwayo, Sarah Avedano, and Denise Ross declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors.

References

References marked with an asterisk indicate studies included in the literature review

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brandi Fontenot
    • 1
  • Margaret Uwayo
    • 1
  • Sarah M. Avendano
    • 2
  • Denise Ross
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyWestern Michigan UniversityKalamazooUSA
  2. 2.Department of Counseling, Psychology, and Special EducationMichigan State UniversityKalamazooUSA

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