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PEAK Pre-Assessments: Preliminary Evidence Establishing Internal Consistency and Construct Validity

  • Brandon K. MayEmail author
  • Lisa Flake
Brief Practice
  • 21 Downloads

Abstract

Promoting the Emergence of Advanced Knowledge (PEAK) is a behavior-analytic tool that assesses and teaches language and cognitive abilities. PEAK preassessment total scores showed statistically significant correlations with measures of intelligence (r = .703, p = .023) and adaptive behavior (r = .618, p = .018), whereas no significant correlations were found between PEAK and age, autism diagnostic instruments, or aggression scales in a sample (N = 18) receiving behavior-analytic assessment in an autism clinic. Statistically significant correlations were found between all modules within the PEAK system (p ≤ .001). Results provide preliminary evidence of the construct validity and internal consistency of the PEAK preassessments.

Keywords

PEAK Construct validity Autism Language assessment 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

All authors declare they have no conflicts of interest.

Ethical Approval

Procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryWashington University in St. LouisSt. LouisUSA

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